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  • Sat: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
  • Sun: Moving Appointments Only

Moving Tips

By law, a moving company cannot transport hazardous materials such as gasoline, flammables, firearms, cleaning fluids, drugs and detergents. Please make other arrangements for moving these items.

  • Do not over-pack boxes – a good rule to follow is “the heavier the item, the smaller the box.”
  • Start with packing items you will not need in advance of your move.
  • Use plenty of paper and bubble wrap, when you shake a box you should not hear anything “rattle”
  • Avoid mixing items from different rooms in the same box.
  • List the room description (bedroom, living room, etc.) on the top and sides of boxes. Also a list of the contents may be helpful.
  •  Pack and unpack breakables over a padded surface, just incase the item is accidentally dropped.
  • Bubble wrap and plain packing paper is highly recommended (ink from newspapers may stain).
  • Always tape boxes (rather than interlocking the flaps).
  • Use packing tape. Other tapes do not adhere to corrugated cardboard.
  • Pack boxes with sealed tops, and make sure nothing is protruding out of the top whenever possible.
  • Pictures, artwork, lamps and other breakables should be properly packed or hand carried to the new location. (Please note ABC Quality Moving does not insure these items unless we professionally pack them).
  • Empty storage cabinets, refrigerators, freezers and anything else that could cause damage by shifting, leaking or defrosting.
  • You may leave clothing in dresser drawers, however anything breakable or spill able should be removed and packed.
  • Empty loose items from desk drawers.
  • Legal size filing cabinets can be moved with the contents in place however lateral file cabinets should be emptied.
  • Have computers, telephones and other electronic devices unplugged and ready to go before the movers arrive. Also small electronics like DVD players and stereo components should be packed in a box.

You might even want to give your new contact information to your old neighbors in case your pet gets lost close to home.

Find a new vet in advance. If you’re moving too far away to continue seeing your regular vet, ask them to recommend a new doctor in the area. Look up an emergency clinic near your new home as well. If you have the time or ability, it might even be a good idea to meet with potential new veterinarians to make sure they’re a good match.

Help your pet adjust to your new house by introducing them slowly. Start them off in one room, with their toys, water, litter, etc. Slowly open up new rooms as your pet starts to get comfortable. This will help your pet feel less overwhelmed in an unfamiliar environment.

If you follow all these steps, your pet should settle into their new home in no time. All it takes is a few simple steps to reduce your pet’s stress and anxiety throughout the process.

  1. Time your move. Sometimes, circumstances dictate when you have to move. But, if you have a choice, try to time your move so that it occurs at a relatively calm period in your child’s life. Take school schedules into consideration, and avoid moving when other big changes (like potty-training or sleeping transitions) are happening, too.
  2. Pull out the pull-ups. If you’ll be traveling by car or plane with a recently potty-trained toddler or pre-schooler, think about putting them in a pull-up for the duration of your trip. It will give you peace of mind, just in case you can’t find a bathroom along the way.
  3. Pack a special bag of favorite toys and activities. Invest in a small backpack or overnight bag that will stay with your child through the entire move. Kids can keep special items like dolls, books, or blankets in this bag, in addition to other toys that they can play with on the car trip or plane ride.
  4. Pack one box of toys last. Your children are going to need things to do right up until the time you move out of your home. Don’t make the mistake of packing all the toys up first because you’ll be left with bored children who just might drive you crazy.
  5. Label boxes of kids’ stuff very clearly. The day will come when you find yourself digging through boxes looking for the toy that they absolutely have to play with right now. Do yourself a favor; don’t just label boxes with the word “toys.” Include as much detail about what is in the box as you can because, trust me, you won’t remember.